Bite The Bullet

It’s that time of year again – the end. And so as we all sit and reflect on this past 2014 we see our year – the highs, the lows, the adventures, the mistakes, the loves and the losses – as if it were an old movie playing on a movie projector whilst we sip on a New Year’s tipple. It is a curious time of year, one where suddenly nostalgia overwhelms even the most brazen of souls. We find ourselves stopping for a moment and looking back on the past 365 days, reflecting on all that we came, saw and conquered. (Can I remind everyone that we survived the end of the world in 2012 – which was really a close call – so really 2014 was piece of cake in comparison. )

This year I learnt that sometimes you have to do things you don’t really want to . In fact the very thought of doing such a task is nauseating and you succeed in putting it off for at least an hour by reasoning with yourself and by the end of those 60 minutes you have a long list of reasons to just call the whole thing off.

But it’s time to finally ” Bite the Bullet”  and get on with it.

It’s pretty easy to work out the meaning of this phrase and the origins of it are equally as straightforward.

Biting the bullet is used to describe gritting your teeth and doing what you have to do , when really you’d rather be washing your dog’s feet after it waded through a cow farm post bovine breakfast time. You get the point – you don’t bite the bullet unless things are really bad, in fact the bullets are usually locked away so it’s a pretty serious situation when the bullets are out and at arms reach let alone anywhere near your dentition.

The saying’s origin is set in one of these bad situations. It is believed to originate in the times of modern warfare. In these times primitive surgeries were necessary with high numbers of wounded soldiers . However the Western Front was no Western General and so access to anaesthesia was minimal. But every cloud; in these times of war, bullets were at hand and so were used as a trench trademarked lidocaine. Soldiers were told to bite down on lead bullets during the most savage surgeries including amputations as a means of enduring the pain and focussing their energy on anything but the body modifications occurring at the end of the bed. And so the saying biting the bullet arose.

Now I’m not suggesting we all risk the quality of our teeth and start carrying pocketful of blank bullets. It wouldn’t look good in the middle of a job interview if  we were to suddenly bring out a bullet nor would our dentists be best pleased. But what I am saying is that life is too short to put things off no matter how unappealing they are and no doubt similar situations will one day arise in the future, and so,  it is better to bite that bullet now before it gains momentum and hits you harder the next time.

Rudyard Kipling says it better than I do, but if there’s one thing I’m taking with me into 2015 it’s the belief that no matter what is expected of me, or what I expect from myself, regardless of the outcome – triumph or disaster – the success is in the bravery of trying.

“If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two imposters just the same.”

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